Chained by Expectations

A SERMON FROM LUKE 7:18-35



By Kevin W. Bounds

Introduction

            Expectations can be misleading. I recall when in the parts business as a counter salesman, I would speak with customers all over the southeastern United States. While conversing on the telephone, I would form a mental image of how I thought the person on the other end of the line might look. Later on, in my career, I became an outside salesman, which allowed me to see the people I once only could visualize. They never looked the way I expected them to look. I learned a valuable lesson. Expectations can be misleading.

In Luke 7:18-35, the characters in this narrative deal with their expectations. This sermon will look at: 1) John’s expectations of Jesus (18-23) 2) The people’s expectation of a prophet (24-30) and finally; 3) What Jesus says about misleading expectations. By examining each aspect of the passage, we will see that if we are not careful, we too can be chained by expectations.

 

John’s Expectations of Jesus (18-23)

  1. First, it is important to look at John’s question concerning Jesus. He asks, “Are You the Expected One, or do we look for someone else?” (19) [Emphasis added].
  2. The Hebrew people had long anticipated the Messiah (or Anointed One). Messiah is the Hebrew title for this person, and Christ is derived from the Greek title of Christus.
  3. Of course, many different opinions were formed on how this coming Deliverer would look and behave.
  4. Per the Prophet Daniel, the timing was ripe for the Expected One to arrive on the scene. Four hundred and eighty-three years had passed since Artaxerxes issued the decree to rebuild Jerusalem. (See Daniel 9).
  5. Earlier, John the Baptist dealt with the people’s expectations (see 3:15) by point to Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah. However, Herod would have John arrested and John at the time of this passage was in prison.
  6. Why would John the Baptist now be questioning Jesus whether He is the One? It is possible, the answer can lie in John’s expectations.
  7. Turn to Luke 3:15-17.
  8. In verse 17, the imagery that John the Baptist uses is one of judgment. It was a common perception in the day of Roman occupation that the Expected One would thrust out all enemy forces from Israel. However, John was imprisoned and this probably made him start to question.
  9. Having a larger view of God’s purpose of Christ’s first Advent, we know that His Second Coming will fulfill John’s expectations. Remember, “For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have eternal life.”For God did not send the Son into the world to judge the world, but that the world might be saved through Him (NASB Jn 3:16-17).
  10. Look back a Luke 7:23 for this is a key verse to understanding this passage. John was borderline offended because he was chained by his expectations.

 

The People’s Expectations of a Prophet (24-30)

  1. In this section, there are two groups of people; the common people and tax collectors and the Pharisees and lawyers.
  2. Jesus addresses misguided expectation by asking a series of questions.
    1. “What did you go out into the wilderness to see? A reed shaken by the wind? (24).
    2. “But what did you go out to see? A man dressed in soft clothing? Those who are splendidly clothed and live in luxury are found in royal palaces!” (25)
    3. “But what did you go out to see? A prophet? Yes, I say to you, and one who is more than a prophet.” (26)
  3. John the Baptist didn’t fit many of the people’s expectations.
  4. The Apostle Paul explains the principle further. He writes,

(26)  For consider your calling, brethren, that there were not many wise according to the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble; (27)  but God has chosen the foolish things of the world to shame the wise, and God has chosen the weak things of the world to shame the things which are strong, (28)  and the base things of the world and the despised God has chosen, the things that are not, so that He may nullify the things that are, (29)  so that no man may boast before God. (NASB 1 Cor 1:26-29).

  1. The next two verses are pivotal!
  2. In verse 29, the “unacceptable of the day” acknowledged God’s justice. This Greek word is It means to show to be righteous, declare righteous.[1] The same word is translated “vindicated” in verse 35.
  3. In verse 30, the religious folks did not acknowledge God’s justice, but “rather rejected God’s purpose for themselves, having not been baptized of John.” The Greek word (boule) translated “purpose” means counsel.[2]
  4. The religious people were chained by their expectations!

 

What Jesus Say About Misleading Expectations (31-35)

  1. Since the religious people’s expectations misled them to reject John the Baptist as a prophet, they ultimately rejected Christ.
  2. John came in one fashion and your rejected him. The Son of Man came in another fashion, but you rejected Him too.
  3. The Apostle Paul captures many of the Jews’ perception of Christ. He writes, “For indeed Jews ask for signs and Greeks search for wisdom; but we preach Christ crucified, to Jews a stumbling block and to Gentiles foolishness,” (NASB 1 Cor 1:22-23).
  4. Remember, “Blessed is he who does not take offense at Me.”(NASB Luk 7:23) and  “Yet wisdom is vindicated by all her children.” (NASB Luk 7:35).

 

Conclusion

  1. Often, we allow our expectations to chain our perception of God. If Jesus was really the Son of God, He ____________ (fill in the blank).
    1. I once was acquainted with a man that said he decided to be an atheist because God didn’t answer his prayers as he expected.
  2. Often, we allow our expectations to color our awareness of God’s love for us. If God really loved me, He would ___________ (fill in the blank).
  3. In John 11, Martha’s expectations of Jesus were that he should have come and healed her brother, Lazarus.
  4. “For as the heavens are higher than the earth, So are My ways higher than your ways And My thoughts than your thoughts. “For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven, And do not return there without watering the earth And making it bear and sprout, And furnishing seed to the sower and bread to the eater; So will My word be which goes forth from My mouth; It will not return to Me empty, Without accomplishing what I desire, And without succeeding in the matter for which I sent it. (NASB Isa 55:9-11).
  5. Trust God not your understanding!
  6. Don’t be chained by your expectations! To mix metaphors, don’t think you can place God in a box.

 

[1]New American Standard Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, (Anaheim, CA: Foundation Publications, 1998), WORDsearch CROSS e-book, Under: “1344”.

[2]New American Standard Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, (Anaheim, CA: Foundation Publications, 1998), WORDsearch CROSS e-book, Under: “1012”.

 

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